Operational Medicine Medical Education and Training

The Genitourinary System II

CORRESPONDENCE COURSE

U.S. ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT CENTER AND SCHOOL

SUBCOURSE MD0580 EDITION 100

THE GENITOURINARY SYSTEM II

This century has seen great changes in sexual feelings, attitudes, and beliefs in American society resulting in greatly changed sexual activities and habits of Americans. Look at the massive changes in just the last forty years. The 1950's were a time when sex was supposed to be a part of marriage. This theme is endlessly repeated in movies of those years. In the early 1960s, however the contraceptive pill appeared making premarital sex freer from unplanned pregnancy.

Many decide that a sexual relationship could exist without the benefit of marriage. Sex was more openly discussed, shown, and talked about in the 60s. Topless bars appeared during these years, and the Broadway shows Hair and Oh! Calcutta with actors appearing nude on stage were performed.

In the 1970s, there was a growing trend for couples to live together prior to marriage. Many people were having sexual relationships more openly outside marriage, often without the thought of marriage to each other in the future. Sex was being thought of as not only "a marriage act" but as a recreational act. By the late 1970s and the 1980s, the growing number of individuals with several sexual partners made a change in the number of cases of sexually ransmitted diseases. The number of cases of these diseases increased dramatically, some disease reaching epidemic proportions.

Some of these diseases are dealt with in this subcourse. It is important for you as a medical NCO to be informed about sexually transmitted diseases as well as other diseases and disorders of the genitalia. In many of these iseases/disorders, early diagnosis and treatment are essential to the return to complete health of the individual.

In sexually transmitted diseases the first step to disease control and eventual eradication is to educate the public (here the soldier) in prevention of these disease.

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Length: 84 Pages

Estimated Hours to Complete: 12

Format: PDF file

Size: 0.6 MB

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Anyone may take this course. However, to receive credit hours, you must be officially enrolled and complete an examination furnished by the Nonresident Instruction Branch at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Enrollment is normally limited to Department of Defense personnel. Others may apply for enrollment, but acceptance is not guaranteed.
 

Internal Male Anatomy

The Genitourinary System II

Distance Learning Course
84 Pages
Est. 12 Hours
0.6 MB pdf file

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Internal Female Genitalia

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

1 DISEASES/DISORDERS OF THE GENITALIA

Section I. Diseases/Disorders of the Male Genitalia

Section II. Diseases/Disorders of the Female Genitalia

Exercises

2 SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES

Section I. General Information

Section II. Specific Types of Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Section III. Laboratory Texts and Procedures

Section IV. The Contact Interview

Exercises

3 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) AND ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS)

Exercises

4 DIURETICS

Exercises

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LESSON 1

DISEASES/DISORDERS OF THE GENITALIA

Section I. DISEASES/DISORDERS OF THE MALE GENITALIA

1-1. INTRODUCTION

Diseases and disorders of the genitalia can be dangerous. Such problems are generally agreeable to therapy if the diagnosis can be established. In your later work, you may be assessing and treating these types of diseases and disorders almost on a daily basis.

1-2. PROSTATITIS

The condition prostatitis is an inflammation of the prostate gland. Prostatitis can be divided into two main categories: (1) acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis and (2) nonbacterial prostatitis. The incidence of prostatitis increases with age.

a. Etiology. Bacterial prostatitis is either acute or chronic and is usually caused by gram-negative organisms such as these: Escherichia coli (most common), Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas. The causative bacterial may reach the prostate gland from the blood stream or from the urethra. Prostatitis is commonly associated with urethritis or an infection of the lower genitourinary tract (an infection such as gonorrhea). Systemic dehydration can play an important part in decreased urinary output. This decreased urinary out put allows microorganisms in the genitourinary tract to multiply.

b. Signs and Symptoms. Included are the following:

(1) Burning on urination.

(2) Pain in the perineum, rectum, lower back and abdomen, glans of the penis.

(3) Chills and moderate to high fever.

(4) Dysuria, polyuria, hematuria.

(5) Urethritis.

(6) Urethral discharge (clear viscous to milk white discharge).

(7) Prostate enlarged, boggy, and very tender.

NOTE: In the condition chronic prostatitis, there may be no symptoms.

c. Treatment. Follow these steps.

(1) Bed rest.

(2) Balanced fluid intake.

(3) Drug therapy. Included are the following:

(a) Analgesic drugs for pain.

(b) Trimethoprim (80 mg) twice a day for 30 days OR

(c) Sulfamethoxazole (400 mg) twice a day for 30 days.

(d) For sulfa sensitive patients:

1 Gentamicin sulfate (Garamycin).

2 Ampicillin (Polycillin).

(4) Culture and sensitivity test of urine. This test can determine the specific drug that will combat the infection.

NOTE: Treatment will depend on the type of prostatitis present--acute or chronic bacterial prostatitis or nonbacterial prostatitis.

(5) Neither the patient nor the physician should massage or milk the penis.

d. Special Considerations.

(1) Be sure the patient understands that bed rest and adequate hydration are necessary. He may need stool softeners and sitz baths, as ordered by the doctor.

(2) Be sure the patient knows that he must take the prescribed drugs faithfully.

(3) It is important for him to know that he must drink at least eight glasses of water a day.

(4) Tell the patient to report immediately signs of possible adverse reaction to drugs, signs such as rash, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, and gastrointestinal irritation.

From The Genitourinary System II

 

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